Saturday, December 16, 2006

Christmas Card Rant

[/rant]Can I just say one thing. If you're going to send me a Christmas card, I'll be delighted. But if you do, please at least write the envelope yourself. I've had eight cards this morning and five of them have typed labels. Maybe I'm being old fashioned, but I do expect my Christmas cards to be handwritten! And what's more, it's always helpful if the handwriting inside is legible - at least that way you can work out if the card is from someone you haven't sent one to! Now, where are the kids, there are some chimneys to sweep...[/rant]

14 comments:

Nicholas Bennett said...

Iain

Only Billy-no-mates handwrites the envelopes - if you've hundreds to do having a computerised list is essential. What I can't abide is cards where the writer either doesn't sign (and has a printed name) and/or doesn't put your name inside. You know then they have been produced by a secretary and the person has just signed all the cards whilst watching TV or dictating letters at the office.

E. Scrooge said...

Christmas! Bah! Humbug!

permanentexpat said...

Iain: A Christmas card tells you, once a year, that someone has remembered you. Stop complaining & accept this comment as Best Christmas Wishes to you ;-))

The Spirit of Christmas to come said...

Nicholas Bennett thereby making my point that Christmas cards are a vacuous gesture, expressing nothing, and creating in the receiver irritation or distain or guilt, which just about accurately reflects the season of goodwill, don't you think?

Cranmer said...

His Grace concurs with Mr Bennett on this matter of protocol, and encorages Mr Dale to reconsider his rant by looking forward to the time he joins the green benches, when he will be expected to send out hundreds of Christmas cards to association officers, branch officers, loyal footsoldiers, civic dignitaries, clergymen, etc., etc., etc.

A typed address label is an imperative, especially when one has to send hundreds of cards to one's flock. And further, a typed label is preferred by Royal Mail, ensuring more accurate delivery.

It is only the greeting and (legible) signature within that must be hand-written. His Grace has (so far) received 18 cards from MPs, all of them personally signed, 11 of them with an additional personalised note. In this context, a typed label on the envelope is utterly irrelevant.

Andrew Kennedy said...

Clearly the Season of Goodwill hasn't reached Royal Tunbridge Wells – although I do agree about pre printed cards and computer produced labels.

There's only one thing worse - and that is the photocopied "newsletter" bringing everyone up to date with Calantha's ballet lessons and news about the family holiday in Nepal.

About 4 years ago my Christmas card list topped 300 and I decided it was time to call a halt.

I now only send cards to people who I would be happy to invite to my home for a meal. My circulation list is now down to 40 or so cards and I have the time to write a personal note in each one.

And no, I don't donate the saved money to charity...this year I blew the whole lot on lobster and Pol Roger at Wilton's.

Happy Christmas !

Johnny Norfolk said...

Iain where do you end with all this.

Dont blog write a book or send me a letter. things move on and you sound a bit Ludite.

Paul Burgin said...

Well Iain if it is any consolation, my card to you and the others at 18 Doughty Street is on the way and handwritten

Voyager said...

Corporate Christmas cards are an absurdity - a corporate entity cannot express sentiments.

All should purchase Christmas Cards from personal funds and address them personally.

Colin said...

I read this while taking a break from hand-writing my cards (and envelopes). It's part of the whole Christmas season to sit down and write a mountain of cards, remembering each person as you address the envelope and try to think of a quick note to scribble inside.

This effort requires sustenance, and mine comes in the form of weak whisky and water, which means that the cards towards the end of the alphabet are more of a challenge for the postie.

Like Iain I deplore the typed or printed address labels, but think that we should make a pragmatic distinction between the personal and corporate card -t he former must be handwritten, the latter can, grudgingly, have address labels but MUST be peronally signed inside. Unless, of course, you are POTUS who has a machine to do the whole thing. But I imagine he has rather a lot of cards to send.

Now, back to the pile of cards and the second whisky ...

Anonymous said...

Iain, I am 1000% with you on this.

If someone can't be arsed to even write the card, then why bother even sending a card - it means about as much as the computerised voice at the station saying 'I am sorry to announce..'

Just be thankful you have been sent one of those vacuous 'round robins'.

Nicholas Bennett is the most stupid thing I have seen on this blog in a long time. Friendship is not about the quantity - it is the quality.

How many of the people you send the cards to will still be there for you if you are ill / end up in prison / get run over by a bus ? Meditate on that when you are with your nearest and dearest this Christmas..

Chuck Unsworth said...

Iain,

I've tried doing the joined-up but only got 3/10 marks.

But I'm really good with the crayons. So is it OK if I use them and BIG LETTERS instead of that fountain pen thingy?

Otherwise my Mum says she'll lend me her 'Biro' - whatever that is.

ian said...

You want legible and handwritten? you can't have it both ways.

(this comment handwritten)

Mickey_Mouse said...

I get my labels printed by a british labels company as they are reasonably priced and i don't have the time to print my own.