Wednesday, February 22, 2006

How to Change the Way Government Works


A friend of mine, Daniel Forrester, has just launched a new blog in America at GovernmentChangeAgents.com. Snappy, eh? He works for Sapient who are a large management consultancy practice and since 2001 he has been heading up their advisory team to the US Department of Homeland Security. Yesterday they launched a paper which highlights the need for innovation and change in government departments. Its perhaps not difficult to guess that many of his conclusions apply to government here too. In fact, more so. The press release blurb says...

The paper captures interviewees’ insights on the concept of change agents in government. Tom Ridge, former Department of Homeland Security Secretary, defines a change agent as someone who “effectively redirects the capacities of individuals or organizations to achieve either better results for a traditional mission or new outcomes based on another assignment.” Scott Hastings, CIO for the US-VISIT program at the Department of Homeland Security, is cited in the paper stating, “Change agents see what is and see what ought to be. You come into the senior executive service government ranks because you see a problem and are willing to take risks to fix it.”

Daniel says: "There is an urgent need for a new breed of leader to spearhead change within government. This research will be a powerful tool for current and future government executives who seek to understand how to have a lasting impact within their agencies and across the
government."


If you'd like to download the full report CLICK HERE. If any broadsheet journalist thinks this would make a feature I'd be happy to pass on Daniel's contact details.

3 comments:

Cllr Iain Lindley said...

Hi Iain

A little off-topic, but I hope you don't mind me giving a small plug for the Vote 2006 Discussion Forum. Thanks!

Edward said...

Where have I heard about Daniel before?

Iain Dale said...

Edward, no idea! I mention an anecdote about him in the intro to my Thatcher book, but I can't think how you would have come across him otherwise.