Saturday, September 30, 2006

A Saturday With My Sisters


This afternoon I visited my sister Tracey (pic top left) at her home in the gloriously named East Sussex village of Upper Dicker. My other sister, Sheena (top right) had travelled down from Saffron Walden too with her partner Alan and my God-daughter Zoe. I don't see either of them very often at the moment which is far more my fault than theirs. I took Gio with me, which was a bit of a risk as he is not very good with children normally. Well, actually he hates them. I used to be known to my nieces as Uncle Herod. Well, if there is a dog equivalent of Herod, Gio is it. But he was on surprisingly good behaviour.

Now I'm back home I suppose I'd better get all the stuff prepared for Bournemouth. Hmmm. 3 fringe meeting speeches to write and God knows what else. Later.

29 comments:

Paul said...

Give Rick Stein his dog back!!!

Jonathan Sheppard said...

He needs a muzzle.... but enough about Iain. Boom Boom!

verity said...

I find it endearing that when people get their pet's photo taken, they always try to hold the pet at what they think is its best angle. We all want other people to think our pet is a little star!

That is a sweet little dog, Iain. I'm a cat person myself. But I like dogs, too.

Rick said...

Why don't your sisters look pleased to see you Iain ?

newmania said...

Upper Dicker is pretty good , on our Cornish holiday I noticed `Brown Willy `the mysterious hill whose foreboding grandeur looms over North Cornwall. I was able to resist the challenge of mounting Brown Willy but I gather it is very often visited by those wishing to sample the wild pleasures of this magnificent promontory. My wife and I were able to take Brown Willy in on the way the Eden Project and resolved that we would sit upon its apex when the next opportunity arose…….


(enough ?)

scroblene said...

Please Iain,

Stick your pocket tape recorder into Cameron's ear and 'blog' some sense into him!

All we need is to get this smug bunch of lefty twits out of the way, and perhaps then we can start building Britain again!

Enjoy Bournemouth - the BICC is the best place to get this country realising what we have lost over the last several years.

Last chance saloon?

tapestry said...

Lend Gio to David Cameron during the Party Conference and ensure he bites a few children on camera - that will bring an end to 'Hug A Hoodie' comments. Keep your sisters out of sight. They look far too friendly.

tapestry said...

Gio should be kept on hand at 18 Doughty Street. Cannot afford to be seen as too friendly. We are Conservatives, you know.

wonkotsane said...

A friend used to live in Willey Furnace. Willey is a small hamlet near Ironbridge. There is a Lord of the Manor there too - Lord Forester of Willey.

Where I used to live - Much Wenlock - there is a brook that runs through the town called Shit Brook.

scroblene said...

Evening Iain,

I normally allow at least three hours to drive to Bournemouth (from near T.Wells). You will be slightly faster in your Audi no doubt.

You can always get a cup of coffee on the A27 at the Little Chef after Arundel, but quite frankly, I prefer to do the trip in one, and relax a bit when I get there.

Why am I telling you this?

Because we are all rooting for a proper blog when you get there.

Safe journey anyway!

newmania said...

More Brown Willy

On Bodmin Moor beside the swelling folds of Brown Willy lies Rough Tor or Rough as the Locals call it . ( honestly). After Rough ,Brown Willy and Heather until one could take no more .I felt a like a visit to nearby Weak St. Mary . I couldn`t say why exactly

beethoven writes said...

Apparently Dicker is an old English word for barter.

"The Romans who traded with the German tribes for skins or hides would take them in a decuria, or bundle of ten, decem, ten. The word was borrowed into the West Germanic tongues as dicker, and for about 1,500 years it meant a unit of ten articles. Then a similiar situation arose on the American frontier in the 18th century when the English Colonists traded for skins with the Indians. `Dicker? Dwker?' they would say. In this way, probably, the word took on a new meaning, referring to haggling and bargaining in trade."--from History of the English Language, by Allen Walker Reed, M.A., B. Litt.

You know what they say about dogs looking like their owners....

HM Stanley said...

Dunno whether this is germaine. I am curretnly undergoing an intensive Anthony Trollope education. Read 5, perhaps 20 to go. He has the most interesting names for Lords...Lords Fawn, Mount Fidgety, Auld Reekie, Dukes of Omnium and St. Bungay, not to mention Messrs. Toogood, Twentyman and Gotobed.

BTW, anybody know of good/interesting Trollope fan net communities?

Robin Hoodie said...

Oy, Tapestry, lay off us Hoodies.

The Ghost Of Peter said...

I know every man was thinking it but I will say it.
Tracy has a fine "set" on her doesnt she?
Blimey, you kept that quiet Dale.
Nice hair, likely to inherit a farm in essex, is she married?

HM Stanley said...

DICKER is still used in American law..one of the requirements for a contract to be valid (at least prior to rise of legal realism) was that the parties "dickered"..bargained back and forth...

Anonymous said...

This is all incredibly solemn, sober and non-controversial, isn't it Iain. Just how you like it no doubt. That piccy of you and your dog just screams Rick Stein, somehow, except he's straight.

Your sisters must be really pissed off with you.

newmania said...

Injured cyclist
WRONG WRONG WRONG
Your etymological excavations on the name Dicker are convincingly disputed by the German School of linguists which, unfortunately, I only have in the original High German so bear with me …the derivation suggested is as follows

` An exhortation to the husband to perform at his best in the nuptial chamber ` -This usage was retained as an archaic form at English May Festivals. We read that, amidst the merry wassailing; young men and women were often spied disappearing into the bushes. `Dicker` `Dicker` the peasants would cry with a the carefree bawdy of the age, and in celebration of the fruitfulness of the season
The origins of Cockermouth are not dissimilar and in parts of the West Country the close association of Cock and Mouth still has a resonance in idiomatic speech to this day.
I was reminded of this fossilised ancient form by Iain dale
Passages full of rich linguistic rootedness are contained in his polling item today. For example `….hard for it. It's now time for David Cameron to ram it down their throats. `… Yes indeed, his use of the English `tongue` is a flickering pleasure is it not
I can think of one contributor who is no doubt already quivering with anticipation at the prospect of receiving David Cameron’s `substance` at Bournemouth.

Robin Hoodie said...

By the way, Iain, nice picture of your Tracey.

Did she sign a consent form?

Anonymous said...

A few people on here would obviously appreciate this:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rude-Britain-Rudest-Place-Names/dp/0752225812

Anonymous said...

`I can think of one contributor who is no doubt already quivering with anticipation at the prospect of receiving David Cameron’s `substance` at Bournemouth.`

You mean Adrain Yalland?

verity said...

Actually, I think Iain had Gio all posed with Gio looking handsomely and alertly at the camera and Iain gave the nod to the photographer and in the millisecond it took to press the shutter, Gio spotted a child.

Fruning Graplecard said...

I took a peek at the hundred of pics on your photo hosting site.

Like these, they are beguiling, candid and evocative.

There isn't a punchline - I am sincere.

Anonymous said...

Tsk Tsk! Politicians who exploit their family for photo opps.

Who said there's no totty left in the Tories????

UK Daily Pundit said...

It should be muzzled. Gio, that is.

Adrian Yalland said...

Very attractive ladies you have as sisters Iain!

I stil think some of the Dorset place names are great - Piddlehapmton, and a group of villages called 'The Slaughters' are my favourites!

verity said...

uk pundit - If you had read the comments of others instead of being so eager to gift us with your witticism, you'd have seen that this was Comment No 2.

newmania said...

Is noone going to say how funny I am .. ? If I don`t start getting a bit more appreciation round here I am not going be funny ever again .I `m not joking I mean it.
Never .

smallheathen said...

And in Worcestershire can be found Wyre Piddle and Bell End.