Monday, August 30, 2010

Two Emotional Interviews

This morning I had the huge honour of interviewing Dickie Bird on LBC. I thought he would be a good person to talk to about this terrible betting scandal that has hit the headlines over the last two days. I wasn't wrong. His voice cracked with emotion. Dickie is a real national treasure and you can hear him taking the whole thing very personally. As I said at the end, it was a real honour to speak to him. The interview lasts nine minutes.

Click HERE to listen.

Another emotional interview I did took place yesterday, when I was covering for Andrew Pierce. I spoke to a 97 year old veteran from the Battle of Britain, Flight Lieutenant William Walker. Seventy years ago last Friday he was shot down over the English Channel and then on Saturday he joined 13 other former Spitfire pilots on a charter flight over the channel, which was joined in formation by a Spitfire and a Hurricane. I don't mind letting on that my eyes were moist as I was interviewing him. The interview lasts 6 minutes.

Click HERE to listen.

And if you missed the hour long Oona King v Ken Livingstone debate a couple of weeks ago, click HERE to listen.

11 comments:

Scary Mary said...

Iain, weeks ago when you started this whole LBC thing you told us that you weren't going to keep mentioning it. Now, every 3rd post seems to be a plug for LBC....
I get that you want to get high traffic there so as to show the channel that you should be made perm, but it is detracting from the quality of the blog...

Iain Dale said...

Sorry, but that's rubbish. Scroll down the screen and apaert from today's you won't find a single post about LBC. But frankly, if there is, so what? It's what I do. This blog is what I do. Many readers like to be alerted to my media and interviews I have done. If you don't, well tough. Look at the title of the blog. It's a diary. Get used to it!

Valleys Mam said...

Enjoyed both interviews
Cheers

albertmbankment said...

I didn't hear your show but I do find your distinctions of language curious in this post. You talk of the 'honour' of meeting Dickie Bird. I'm sure he's a nice-enough bloke, but he's merely a long-retired umpire for a minority sport who has become a sporting media-tart.

I would, however, be honoured to meet William Walker, whom I heard interviewed on 'Today' about 10 days ago, but you do not accord him the same awe. What an astonishingly courteous and self-effacing chap, and such a strong voice and pin-sharp memory for one of his years.

I met Douglas Bader a few times when I was a lad, and he was an odious monster of a man - although that does not in any way detract from his inspirational qualities of defiance and patriotism. Some others of The Few whom I met were just as humbling, but far less prima donna-ish. Bader was cordially loathed by many of them!

I Squiggle said...

Two good interviews, particularly the latter. Why do people not get the idea that this is your blog, we can come here if we want, or not. We’re not paying a licence fee for it, nor a subscription – any dosh required is your risk. You could advertise what the heck you like, and frequently do. But that’s because it’s your blog.

p.s. Were you in the bar of the Radisson Hotel on the Royal Mile in Edinburgh mid last week? Specs eh?

Paul Donnelley said...

Dickie Bird is one of cricket's greatest ambassadors and a jolly nice chap to boot. Despite being in poor health, he wrote the foreword for my book "Cricket On This Day".

It's about time Her Majesty said, "Arise Sir Dickie (or Harold)."

Iain Dale said...

I Squiggle, not to my knowledge!

I Squiggle said...

Iain – you must have a doppelganger then. I think it was Wednesday (could have been Thursday) early evening when ‘he’ walked into the bar, had a look round then wandered off. Spitting image..

cyberboris said...

http://cyberboris.wordpress.com/2010/08/30/a-dark-day-at-lords/

From the picture on link above, you can see the hurt and anger in the eyes of the England cricket team at the awards ceremony, as Amir, only 17 years old, awkwardly accepted his award.

That was such a tremendous, inspiring performance when he took six wickets, and then Trott and Broad fought back like lions. it was so inspiring. And now it is all so awfully sad.

Iain Dale said...

Isquiggle, well, I was in Edinburgh on Wed & Thur, but I dont recall ging into a Raddison...

COVENTRYBRIAN said...

'albertembankment' has a valid point regarding Dickie Bird.

To those of us in the cricketing world he was a top umpire, years ago, but although totally harmless he has become a crushing old bore who has revelled in becoming a sporting media-tart.
It's taken a long time but the penny has finally dropped with most of the media who have finally realised that Dickie has self promoted himself as unofficial rentaquote on all Cricketing matters. He was a legend, but sadly no more.

His famous stock phrase: "it's a sad day for cricket" was used at least 9 times in your interview.

Sorry Iain, you were a bit naive falling for this one. Dickie has nothing relevant to contribute about the modern game.